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Kitchen Tips

3 Comments and 23 Shares
Household tip: Tired of buying so much toilet paper? Try unspooling the paper from the roll before using it. A single roll can last for multiple days that way, and it's much easier on your plumbing.
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wreichard
5 days ago
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This is 99% of the internet.
Earth
popular
3 days ago
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tante
5 days ago
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xkcd on lifehacks
Oldenburg/Germany
JayM
8 days ago
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Hahaha. :)
Boston Metro Area

How to age gracefully

4 Comments and 10 Shares

After 11 years, the WireTap radio show is coming to an end. As a farewell, they put together a video of people giving advice to their younger counterparts.

Dear 6-year-old,

Training wheels are for babies. Just let go already.

Regards,

A 7-year-old.

Dear 7-year-old,

Stay weird.

Signed,

An 8-year-old.

This video is magical...give it 20 seconds and you can't help but watch the whole thing. (via a cup of jo)

Tags: how to   video
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sredfern
4 days ago
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Fuck those popular kids who like #hashtags and popular culture!!
Sydney Australia
vitormazzi
2 days ago
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Brasil
popular
3 days ago
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dreadhead
5 days ago
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Vancouver Island, Canada
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emdot
5 days ago
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Why am I crying? Do not watch this at work. Unless you like choking back tears at work.
San Luis Obispo, CA
cinebot
5 days ago
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this
toronto.
omegar
5 days ago
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Must watch
México, D.F.

skunkbear: skunkbear: The past is packed with monsters!...

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skunkbear:

skunkbear:

The past is packed with monsters! Behemoths by the dozen!
Let’s meet these fossils! (and their less colossal modern cousins)

Earth’s ancient history is full of giant versions of modern animals. Evolutionary forces (competition for resources, changes in climate) pushed these species to become incredibly large. And I’m not just talking about giant dinosaurs - there were huge mammals and marsupials too. 

A lot of these giants lived in the Pleistocene, an epoch stretching from around 2.5 million to 11,000 years ago. Mysteriously, the extinction of many of these animals coincides with humanity’s arrival as a dominant predator.

Watch a video / listen to a poem about these prehistoric monsters.

Illustrations by Mary McLain

I love me some prehistoric megafauna… megafauna…

We can thank some of these extinct giants for the evolution of the avocado. Don’t Don’t believe me? Watch this:

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smadin
3 days ago
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HELL PIG
Boston
samuel
3 days ago
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Damn those are big animals. From 2.5 MYA to only 11,000 years ago.
The Haight in San Francisco
popular
3 days ago
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satadru
3 days ago
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New York, NY
vitormazzi
3 days ago
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Brasil
TheRomit
3 days ago
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santa clara, CA
gabrielgeraldo
3 days ago
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São Paulo
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adamcole
3 days ago
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GET WITH THE PROGRAM WHALES
Philadelphia, PA, USA

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Super Efficient

3 Comments and 14 Shares

Hovertext: All telepaths are now employed by high-speed trading firms.


New comic!
Today's News:

 Over half of general admission tickets for BAHFest East have sold out already! You geeks are the best :)

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brico
3 days ago
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Brooklyn, NY
vitormazzi
4 days ago
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Brasil
popular
4 days ago
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tante
3 days ago
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Efficiency of Superheroes.
Oldenburg/Germany
jorgemonday
4 days ago
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That's about right.
gradualepiphany
4 days ago
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Average is over?
Los Angeles, California, USA

I mean, I think this was inevitable. Feel free to use it, MTA!

1 Comment and 9 Shares


I mean, I think this was inevitable. Feel free to use it, MTA!

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popular
5 days ago
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satadru
6 days ago
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New York, NY
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tante
4 days ago
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Don't be a Riker, be a Picard.
Oldenburg/Germany

These companies are both destroying the personal lives of their employees and getting nothing in return.

jwz
3 Comments and 12 Shares
Many people believe that weekends and the 40-hour workweek are some sort of great compromise between capitalism and hedonism.

You might think: but if you had prioritized those things, wouldn't your contributions have been reduced? Would Facebook have been less successful?

Actually, I believe I would have been more effective: a better leader and a more focused employee. I would have had fewer panic attacks, and acute health problems  --  like throwing out my back regularly in my early 20s. I would have picked fewer petty fights with my peers in the organization, because I would have been generally more centered and self-reflective. I would have been less frustrated and resentful when things went wrong, and required me to put in even more hours to deal with a local crisis. In short, I would have had more energy and spent it in smarter ways... AND I would have been happier. That's why this is a true regret for me: I don't feel like I chose between two worthy outcomes. No, I made a foolish sacrifice on both sides. [...]

Many people believe that weekends and the 40-hour workweek are some sort of great compromise between capitalism and hedonism, but that's not historically accurate. They are actually the carefully considered outcome of profit-maximizing research by Henry Ford in the early part of the 20th century. He discovered that you could actually get more output out of people by having them work fewer days and fewer hours. Since then, other researchers have continued to study this phenomenon, including in more modern industries like game development.

The research is clear: beyond ~40 -- 50 hours per week, the marginal returns from additional work decrease rapidly and quickly become negative. We have also demonstrated that though you can get more output for a few weeks during "crunch time" you still ultimately pay for it later when people inevitably need to recover. If you try to sustain crunch time for longer than that, you are merely creating the illusion of increased velocity. This is true at multiple levels of abstraction: the hours worked per week, the number of consecutive minutes of focus vs. rest time in a given session, and the amount of vacation days you take in a year.

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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samuel
5 days ago
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I worked 66 hours this past week and that's just about where I feel most comfortable. Anything above 70 is overkill, and below 60 I feel like I'm not getting enough done.
The Haight in San Francisco
loic
4 days ago
That's a lot. 11 hours a day 6 days a week...
samuel
4 days ago
More like 12 hours on weekdays and a few hours on weekends.
samuel
4 days ago
This will make a whole lot more sense in a couple months when I finally announce my latest project.
loic
4 days ago
#teasing ;)
smadin
8 days ago
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If all salaried employees were eligible for overtime, we'd see the "culture of intensity" disappear real fast.
Boston
gradualepiphany
3 days ago
I don't know about that. I worked a LOT more when I was hourly and was getting paid overtime. Now that I am salaried, I don't work much OT at all. Different industry with different market forces, but whether or not a company has to pay overtime isn't the only or even the main consideration for how hard they work people (in my experience).
etiberius
5 days ago
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ÜT: 33.997032,-86.035736
popular
6 days ago
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kazriko
8 days ago
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I try not to exceed 50 hours for too many weeks in a row. I think I normally average between 46 and 48. At least, back when I was still getting overtime. I'm mostly stuck at 40 right now.
Colorado Plateau
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