Popular shared stories on NewsBlur.
1158 stories
·
26161 followers

shrimpojess: clittyslickers: very into charts about naps Nap...

5 Comments and 9 Shares


shrimpojess:

clittyslickers:

very into charts about naps

Nap charts guys.

want the NASA nap, but fear I would get stressed out by its proximity time-wise to the Bad Nap

Read the whole story
smadin
2 days ago
reply
Important Napping News
Boston
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
sness
22 minutes ago
reply
naps are good
JayM
2 hours ago
reply
.
Boston Metro Area
fredw
2 days ago
reply
relevant
Portland, OR

When Iggy Pop can’t live off his art, what chance do the rest have?

3 Comments and 7 Shares

I have a soft spot for Iggy Pop, partly because I interviewed him once and he was the soul of charm and erudition, like a particularly smart music professor who just happened to be wearing leather pants and eyeliner. On stage, he’s awe-inspiring, dancing like an electrified Twizzler. (I mean that as the highest possible compliment.) He still makes lean, ferocious music.

More Related to this Story

At least he used to. As the head Stooge and godfather of punk revealed this week, he can’t actually live off music any more. Not that Iggy ever had the commercial clout of say, Justin Bieber – which is proof, if you needed, of a god-shaped hole in the universe – but he struggled along from label to label, alienating executives here, picking up new fans over there.

But a new reality has tripped him up and it’s the same one shafting artists all across the world: Namely, that everyone wants to listen, and no one wants to pay. This week, Iggy gave a lecture for the British Broadcasting Corp. called Free Music in a Capitalist Society. Artists have always been ripped off by corporations, he said; now the public is in on the free ride, too: “The cat is out of the bag and the new electronic devices, which estrange people from their morals, also make it easier to steal music than to pay for it.”

To keep skinny body and maverick soul together, Iggy’s become a DJ, a car-insurance pitchman and a fashion model. If he had to live off royalties, he said, he’d have to “tend bars between sets.” As I listened to his enthusiastic stoner Midwestern drawl, I thought: If Iggy Pop can’t make it, what message does that send to all the baby Iggys out there? In a society where worth is judged by price, for better or worse, what are you saying to someone when you won’t pay for the thing he’s crafted?

A few days before Iggy’s lecture, Australian novelist Richard Flanagan won the Booker Prize, the most prestigious in the literary world, for his Second World War story The Narrow Road to the Deep North. Just in time, it sounds like: Mr. Flanagan told reporters that he was making so little from his writing that he was thinking about packing it in and becoming a miner. (He comes from a small mining town in Tasmania.) The prize money of about $90,000 and the following sales bump will allow him to continue, but most of his colleagues aren’t so lucky: “Writing is a very hard life for so many writers,” he said.

This is borne out not only in the quiet sobbing you hear in corners at poetry readings, but in the numbers. This summer, the Guardian newspaper reported that professional writers’ salaries in Britain are collapsing, falling almost 30 per cent over eight years to $20,000.

Here, the Writers’ Union of Canada estimates that authors make an average of $12,000 a year from their words. That will buy approximately two wheels of a car or a door knob on a house in Toronto or Calgary (a broken knob, if the house is in Vancouver).

I hear your cry-me-a-river sighs. You’re thinking, “Nobody asked writers to write. Don’t they know a nice degree in commerce will serve them better in the long run? Nobody asked Iggy to roll around on stage in broken glass. He could have had a nice job as an actuary, although he would have had to keep his pants on.”

But in truth, we do ask: Every time we go to a library or shop, we want it to be full of new books, and when we search various channels (legal and illegal) for new music and movies, we expect to find them. Someone has to produce this content – this art – and sadly, the shoemakers’ elves are all busy stitching elsewhere. And after it’s been produced, someone has to buy it. Or not buy it, as is more likely the case.

It comes down to a question of value: Do we value artists’ effort? The boring years spent in the studio or rehearsal hall, the torched drafts – Mr. Flanagan burned five early versions of his novel before he got it right – the slow, fungal growth of something that lives in the dark and may never be ready for the light? Sorry, that’s the novelist in me talking. Never mind.

I’m glad Iggy Pop and Mr. Flanagan have brought the issue of artists’ earnings out into the open, because it’s too often avoided as embarrassing or demeaning or irrelevant to the process. In fact, it’s crucial. As author and cartoonist Tim Kreider wrote in a recent essay about not getting paid for his work, “money is also how our culture defines value, and being told that what you do is of no ($0.00) value to the society you live in is, frankly, demoralizing.”

Or, to give Iggy the last word, which I think he’d like: “When it comes to art, money is an unimportant detail. It just happens to be a huge unimportant detail.”

Follow Elizabeth Renzetti on Twitter: @lizrenzetti

Read the whole story
wreichard
11 hours ago
reply
"Mr. Flanagan told reporters that he was making so little from his writing that he was thinking about packing it in and becoming a miner."
Earth
Share this story
Delete
2 public comments
JayM
2 hours ago
reply
.
Boston Metro Area
Cafeine
8 hours ago
reply
Yep... :\
Paris / France

OS X 10.10 Yosemite: The Ars Technica Review

5 Comments and 8 Shares
Yosemite banner
Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock

When the book is finally closed on the product line known as OS X, last year’s release of OS X 10.9 Mavericks may end up getting short shrift. Sure, it brought tangible energy saving benefits to Mac laptop owners, but such gains are quickly taken for granted; internal changes and new frameworks are not as memorable to customers as they may be to developers and technophiles. And while Mavericks included many new user-visible features, and even new bundled applications, the cumulative effect was that of a pleasant upgrade, not a blockbuster.

But for all its timidity and awkwardness, Mavericks marked a turning point for OS X—and in more than just naming scheme. It was the first OS X release from the newly unified, post-Forstall Apple. If iOS 7 was the explosive release of Jony Ive’s pent-up software design ethos, then Mavericks was the embodiment of Craig Federighi’s patient engineering discipline. Or maybe Mavericks was just a victim of time constraints and priorities. Either way, in last year’s OS X release, Apple tore down the old. This year, finally, Apple is ready with the new.

To signal the Mac’s newfound confidence, Apple has traded 10.9’s obscure surfing location for one of the best known and most beautiful national parks: Yosemite. The new OS’s headline feature is one that’s sure to make for a noteworthy chapter in the annals of OS X: an all-new user interface appearance. Of course, this change comes a year after iOS got its extreme makeover.

Read 406 405 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Read the whole story
fxer
3 days ago
reply
Best reading all year, every year
Bend, Oregon
fancycwabs
3 days ago
I got to page 4: "Even more excruciating detail about fonts and buttons" before giving up.
fxer
2 days ago
Haha I live Siracusa, his domain is Hypercritical.co if that tells you anything :) Also another post by him on the creation of his Ars review! Spoiler: it requires 2500+ lines of perl. http://hypercritical.co/2014/10/16/yosemite
ChrisDL
3 days ago
reply
oh man, john siracusa yosemite review. I almost read this more just to appreciate the depth of the actual review and the work that went into it than to find out stuff about yosemite.
New York
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
laza
8 hours ago
reply
Siracusa do it again!
Belgrade, Serbia
jimwise
10 hours ago
reply
No MacOS release cycle is complete until the Siracusa review is up...
lukeburrage
3 days ago
reply
"Read 405 remaining paragraphs" - Thank goodness for Instapaper and a 10 hour flight on Saturday!

How the Colbert Report is made

3 Comments and 8 Shares

For the first episode of podcast called Working, David Plotz talks to Stephen Colbert about how he and his staff construct The Colbert Report. This is fascinating.

My show is a shadow of the news, so I have to know what shadow it's casting right now, so I can distort it in my own way.

At the 13 minute mark, he talks about how the team communicates with each other about how the show is shaping up, changes, concerns, etc. They do it all by what sounds like text messaging. Paging Stewart Butterfield, you should get those folks on Slack. (via digg)

Tags: audio   David Plotz   interviews   Stephen Colbert   The Colbert Report   working
Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
aaronwe
1 day ago
reply
Great listen.
Sioux City, Iowa
cmn
2 days ago
reply
Thanks for sharing!
Copenhagen
cinebot
2 days ago
reply
BEST
toronto.

#1069; Render Unto Paper

3 Comments and 7 Shares

I'm usin' up all my letterhead on these dang animated GIFs!

Read the whole story
Share this story
Delete
3 public comments
zippy72
15 hours ago
reply
alt-text: I'm usin' up all my letterhead on these dang animated GIFs!
FourSquare, qv
kazriko
2 days ago
reply
All we really need to do is dump them to mbox format and put them on a MDISC bluray. As long as people keep making bluray disc readers for archival purposes, they'll be able to read it for a thousand years. You could dump 2-3 people's completely full GMAIL accounts to a single disc using thunderbird.

Mbox format is so simple, that you can read it with a text editor.
Colorado Plateau
mareino
2 days ago
reply
I kind of want this program.
Washington, District of Columbia

100 Technical Things Non-Technical People Can Learn To Make Their Lives Easier

7 Comments and 20 Shares

My lovely wife has an MBA, speaks 5 languages, and is currently in school to get a third (fourth?) degree. Point is, she's smarter than me (I? See?) and I'm lucky she even speaks to me.

It seems to run on some sort of electricity

However, she's in a class right now and wanted to record the hour long lectures. After trying on her Windows Phone, her iPad, her Laptop with OneNote she got very frustrated. I gave her a portable handheld recorder and she returned from class with 800 megs of wav files then asked me how to share them with the rest of the class.

This started a long talk about WAV files vs. mp3s, DropBox vs. email, megabytes vs. gigabytes and developing a sense of "digital scale." We talked about pixels and dpi, about 40 megapixel vs a 400x400 picture.

She said to me "there's all this stuff that techies know that makes normals feel bad. Where does one learn all this?"

  • Why does this picture print out blurry?
  • Why is that file too big to email?
  • I deleted Angry Birds but my computer is still slow!

"Knowing computers" today is more than just knowing Office, or knowing how to attach a file. Today's connected world is way more complex than any of us realize. If you're a techie, you're very likely forgetting how far you've come!

The #1 thing you can do when working with a non-techie is to be empathetic. Put yourself in their shoes. Give them the tools and the base of knowledge they need.

I honestly don't know HOW we learn these things. But, I figured I could help. If you've ever answered questions like this from your non-technical-partner or relative, then here's a list of

100 Technical Things Non-Technical People Can Learn To Make Their Lives Easier

Ok, perhaps not 100 exactly. I will add more good tips if you suggest them in the comments!

Size

  • A gigabyte is big. It's not something that is easily emailed.

  • A gigabyte might be a whole movie! If you want to get a gigabyte to someone you could either compress/squish it with some software and send a smaller version of the file, or put it on a USB drive and snail mail (post) it.

  • One to five megabytes are reasonable sizes. You can have pictures this size, documents, and small videos.

  • MB means Megabyte. GB means Gigabyte. Note that the abbreviation 1GB means 1000MB, so always double check and look closely.

  • Backup everything. Is your entire company on your 10 year old computer’s desktop? Look for Backup options like CrashPlan, DropBox, OneDrive, etc. Literally ANYTHING is better than leaving documents on your computer’s desktop.

Files

  • Think about where your files are. Are they in a folder on your Desktop? Are they in a folder called My Documents? Keep your files collected in one location (and below) so that you can easily make backups.

  • Learn to use search to find your files. Press the Windows key and just start typing on Windows, or use Spotlight (Command-Spacebar) on Mac.

  • Don’t forget to hover over things and right-mouse-click on things. It may not be initially intuitive, but right clicking often answers all your questions.

  • If you double click a file and it doesn’t do what you want, in Windows, right click the file, choose Open With, then Choose Default Program to pick a new program.

Privacy

Email

  • Assume that your email isn't private.

  • Don’t try to email more than 10 megabytes. Or 5 even. Many of your recipients won’t get the files. They will “bounce back.”

  • Don’t CC more than 10 of your friends or neighbors. At that point, consider another way to talk to them. Some of your friends may not want their email given to the world. Perhaps this is a time to use BCC (Blind Carbon Copy) so you don't expose everyone's email address to each other? an BCC situation?

  • Always think twice when replying. Did you want to Reply To All?

  • It’s a good idea to check for hoaxes before forwarding bulk emails. For instance, look at snopes.com if you think Bill Gates may send you money.

  • If you get an email out of the blue that’s telling you to click on a link to “verify”
    your password, credit card, or other information, it’s a good idea not to click on the link. Instead, open a browser and navigate to your account on the site in question.

  • Never ever send your private credit card number, social security number, or anything personal in email. Ever. Really. Never.

Searching

  • If you put your search term - or parts of it - in quotes, you’ll get more specific results. For instance, “mark hamill” “star wars” would probably get better results than mark hamill star wars.

  • Your search term should sound like the answer you’re looking for rather than the question. So search for “2000 academy award winner” instead of “who was that guy who won that film award in 2000”?

  • If you want to google within a single site, try “site:thatsite.com mysearch” to search ONLY thatsite.com.

  • If you get an error message or code when a program stops working, just search for that number, like “0x8000abcd”

  • Be LESS specific. Every new word you add is narrowing your results!

  • You can search for the original source of a picture using Google Image search and uploading the image. It will find other places on the internet that picture lives!

  • If you don’t want someone to know that you’re searching for something that’s either secret or naughty, use your browser’s “Incognito Mode” or “Private Browsing Mode.” Note that while this may hide your browsing from a specific computer, that computer still has to talk to other computers to talk to the internet. Incognito Mode won’t hide your surfing from your boss.

Sound Files

  • MP3s are squished audio files. Remember the rules of thumb around file sizes when emailing.

  • WAV files are big audio files. You can use a program like Audacity to take a uncompressed WAV and “Save As” it into a Compressed MP3.

Documents

  • PDFs are Portable Documents. They are made by Adobe and work pretty much everywhere. This is a good format for Resumes. You can often Save As your document and create a PDF. Also, note that PDFs are almost always considered read-only.

  • Word has doc files and newer docx files. When working with a group, select a format that is common to everyone’s version of Word. Some folks may have old versions!

  • Big documents are hard to move around the internet. Rather than emailing that giant document, instead put it in a shared location like Dropbox, OneDrive or Google Drive, then using the Sharing feature of your chosen service, email a LINK to the document.

  • Collaborating with others by e-mailing documents around doesn’t work very well. If you’re sharing a document as recommended above, you can take advantage of their realtime collaboration features.

  • Don’t use a document when you need something bigger. Your small business’ records should probably go in a database rather than an Excel file.

  • In Windows, files end with a file extension like “.docx”, “.mp3” or “.jpg” that determines what program it’s associated with. If you save a file with the wrong extension, it might open with another program or not at all.

  • Sometimes you can’t see file extensions. In Windows Explorer, in the View Menu, pick File Extension to show them if they’re hidden.

Scanning and Faxing

  • An easy way to scan documents without a scanner is to use a scanning app on your phone. This means you’ll take a picture of the document. There are apps that can make your camera like a scanner.

  • If you need to fax but don’t have a fax machine, there are apps online that can take a photo from your phone and fax it. You can also received faxes as photos or PDFs.

USB Keys

  • Never put a random USB key in your computer. You have no idea where it’s been.

  • USB keys can do all kinds of things to your computer the second you plug it in without your even opening a file. Only use trusted USB keys.

My computer is slow

  • Think about what specifically is slow. Often the thing that’s slow is your internet. Are you on wireless? Is the signal weak?

  • Running a lot of programs at once can slow things down.

  • When your hard drive is almost completely full, your computer can slow down. Watch for warnings!

  • The cheapest, simplest way to speed up a slow computer is usually by adding more RAM (memory).

Bandwidth

  • Not everyone has super fast internet. Some people have a quota for the month. For example, my brother can download only 5 gigabytes (remember that’s 5,000 megabytes) every month. I avoid sending him big files and YouTube links.

    Security and The Evil Internet

    • Most of the internet is out to get you. If a website looks wrong, it’s likely not somewhere you want to me. The more ads and popups the worse the neighborhood.

    • If you go looking for things you shouldn’t, like bootleg movies, you’ll be more likely to end up in a bad part of the internet.

    • Bad parts of the Internet will always try to trick you.

    • Be aware of advertisements that are actually pictures of download buttons. These download buttons might literally be next to the actual download button you need to press.

    • Always think three times before clicking on a link that’s been emailed to you. If you have to install something or a message tells you that your computer is missing something, it may be a trick.

    • Consider if a web site’s domain ends with a far away country code you weren’t expecting. Did I mean to be looking for a link in China (.cn) or Kazakhstan (.kz)?

    • Microsoft and Apple will never call your house to tell you personally that you have a virus.

    • Consider turning on “Two Factor Authentication.” That means that in addition to your password you’ll also need your phone with you to login in. That might sound like a hassle, but it stops the bad guys in their tracks.

    "Space" - Disks and Memory

    • Memory is like the top of your desk - it’s what you’re working on right now. Disk space is like your filing cabinet, where you store things for later. When you turn off your computer, your memory is cleared but your hard drive isn’t.

    • If you computer is “just slow” there could be a few things going on. Are a lot of things running right now this moment? Close running programs, just like taking things off your desk and clear your mind.

    • Rarely will uninstalling applications “free up space.” If you computer is filling up, it’s likely with photos, videos or movies. Uninstalling Angry Birds from either your computer or phone likely won’t free up the large amounts of space you want.

    Pictures

  • JPGs are image files that are great for photos. They are squished pictures, and the compression is optimized for pictures of people and nature.

  • PNGs are image files that are great for diagrams and screenshots.

  • Learn how to take screenshots.

    • Press the PrintScreen key to put a screenshot of the current screen in your clipboard on a Windows PC.

    • On a Windows 8 machine, press the Windows Key and the PrintScreen key to capture the screen to a Folder in your Pictures folder called Screenshots.

    • Press Command-Shift-3 to capture your screen to the desktop on ac Mac

  • Resizing images can be hard and frustrating. On Windows, try the Image Resizer Utility to make large images smaller.

  • Pictures

  • The funny pictures you find on the internet are usually small in “dimension” - they have a small number of total dots or “pixels.”

  • A picture that is 400x400 in pixel dimension will look really blurry when it’s printed out on a full piece of paper.

  • For a photo to look nice when printed, it should ideally have more than 200 dots per inch. So for a 4 inch by 6 in photo, you’ll want a picture that’s at LEAST 800x1200, and even larger is better.

  • Megapixels are not megabytes. One megapixel is one million pixels. A “3.1 megapixel” camera will actually make a photoi that is 2048x1536 in dimension. This is nice size for printing in small sizes! A photo like this will be about one megabyte and suitable for emailing.

  • Photos matter. Back them all up.

Security and The Evil Internet

  • Most of the internet is out to get you. If a website looks wrong, it’s likely not somewhere you want to me. The more ads and popups the worse the neighborhood.

  • If you go looking for things you shouldn’t, like bootleg movies, you’ll be more likely to end up in a bad part of the internet.

  • Bad parts of the Internet will always try to trick you.

  • Be aware of advertisements that are actually pictures of download buttons. These download buttons might literally be next to the actual download button you need to press.

  • Always think three times before clicking on a link that’s been emailed to you. If you have to install something or a message tells you that your computer is missing something, it may be a trick.

  • Consider if a web site’s domain ends with a far away country code you weren’t expecting. Did I mean to be looking for a link in China (.cn) or Kazakhstan (.kz)?

  • Microsoft and Apple will never call your house to tell you personally that you have a virus.

  • Consider turning on “Two Factor Authentication.” That means that in addition to your password you’ll also need your phone with you to login in. That might sound like a hassle, but it stops the bad guys in their tracks.

"Space" - Disks and Memory

  • Memory is like the top of your desk - it’s what you’re working on right now. Disk space is like your filing cabinet, where you store things for later. When you turn off your computer, your memory is cleared but your hard drive isn’t.

  • If you computer is “just slow” there could be a few things going on. Are a lot of things running right now this moment? Close running programs, just like taking things off your desk and clear your mind.

  • Rarely will uninstalling applications “free up space.” If you computer is filling up, it’s likely with photos, videos or movies. Uninstalling Angry Birds from either your computer or phone likely won’t free up the large amounts of space you want.

Pictures

  • JPGs are image files that are great for photos. They are squished pictures, and the compression is optimized for pictures of people and nature.

  • PNGs are image files that are great for diagrams and screenshots.

  • Learn how to take screenshots.

    • Press the PrintScreen key to put a screenshot of the current screen in your clipboard on a Windows PC.

    • On a Windows 8 machine, press the Windows Key and the PrintScreen key to capture the screen to a Folder in your Pictures folder called Screenshots.

    • Press Command-Shift-3 to capture your screen to the desktop on ac Mac

  • Resizing images can be hard and frustrating. On Windows, try the Image Resizer Utility to make large images smaller.

Surfing and Links

  • Often you’ll search for something on a site, then end up on a page called “searchresults.asp.” You’ll want to share that link with your friend so you copy paste it and send them somesite.com/searchresults.asp. But you need to look at that URL (URL is a link). Does the link contain the thing you searched for? If not, your friend won’t see anything. Look for links like somesite.com/searchresults.asp?q=baby%20groot%20doll when emailing.

  • Search results often have a “share” link that will either get you a good sharing link or send via e-mail for you.

  • Always check for the lock in your browser address bar when you’re about to enter your password. Are you where you think you are? Does the address bar look correct? Is it green? The green address bar gives you more information about the company you’re talking to.

  • Is your password “Password”? Consider getting a password manager like 1Password or LastPass. Don’t put your password on a post-it note on your monitor. Try not to reuse passwords between sites. Don’t share your password with others.

  • Don’t reuse your passwords. If you give a tech support person a password and it's also the password you use for your bank, it’s like giving a parking attendant the keys to your house!

Big thanks to Jon Galloway for his help with this list!

tech_support_cheat_sheet

What did we miss?


Sponsor: Thanks for my friends at Octopus Deploy for sponsoring the feed this week. Their product is fantastic. Using NuGet and powerful conventions, Octopus Deploy makes it easy to automate releases ofASP.NET applications and Windows Services. Say goodbye to remote desktop and start automating today!



© 2014 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.
Read the whole story
wreichard
1 day ago
reply
Once we learned the plants of the forest. This is more useful now.
Earth
Share this story
Delete
6 public comments
skittone
14 hours ago
reply
Not a bad list, but people who don't know these things aren't the "normals" anymore.
kleer001
1 day ago
reply
Hopefully in the future basic computer literacy will be a thing
adamcole
1 day ago
reply
I'll be handing out this list with credit at every computer basics class I teach at the library from now on.
Philadelphia, PA, USA
leiter420
1 day ago
reply
Good read for those not technically proficient.
jimwise
1 day ago
reply
...
josephwebster
2 days ago
reply
And this about covers it.
Denver, CO, USA
Next Page of Stories