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By GenjiandProust in "Keene, NH Pumpkin fest: come for the jack-o'-lanterns, stay for the riot" on MeFi

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Unlike black people, white people apparently don't need any sort of actual cause to riot, they just do it every so often.

As I have said elsewhere, many white people are descended from Germanic and Nordic peoples who raged through Europe for roughly 1000 years. The urge to riot is in their blood. It's genetic. They might not be bad people at heart, but some inner imperative will always rise up and force them to try and sack Rome, or the nearest pumpkin festival, portapotty, or international banking system. We should pity these people, in thrall to their base ancestral instincts. They sometimes make good athletes or musicians, though. It has something to do with their muscle fibers.
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acrentz
23 hours ago
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I see what you did there.
Santa Clara, CA (formerly ATL)

Orb Hammer

2 Comments and 11 Shares
Ok, but make sure to get lots of pieces of rock, because later we'll decide to stay in a room on our regular orb and watch hammers hold themselves and hit rocks for us, and they won't bring us very many rocks.
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trparky
2 days ago
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Alt Text: Ok, but make sure to get lots of pieces of rock, because later we'll decide to stay in a room on our regular orb and watch hammers hold themselves and hit rocks for us, and they won't bring us very many rocks.
phogan
3 days ago
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NASA's campaign to destroy The Moon That Hideous Mocking Rock.
Massapequa Park, NY

October 18, 2014

2 Comments and 7 Shares

See y'all at BAHFest East!
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Levitz
4 days ago
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If I were a teacher, _every_ analogy would involve badgers…and spoons ;)
orpheus17d
5 days ago
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C'mon, somebody do it!

shrimpojess: clittyslickers: very into charts about naps Nap...

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shrimpojess:

clittyslickers:

very into charts about naps

Nap charts guys.

want the NASA nap, but fear I would get stressed out by its proximity time-wise to the Bad Nap

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smadin
5 days ago
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Important Napping News
Boston
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pdj
3 days ago
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Interesting. I love napping.
/dev/random
jlvanderzwan
3 days ago
I have some difficulties with believing down-to-the-minute precision in these generalisations, though.
sness
3 days ago
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naps are good
xbai
2 days ago
the 30 mins one is tricky, we need precise timing, lol
JayM
3 days ago
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.
Boston Metro Area
fredw
5 days ago
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relevant
Portland, OR

When Iggy Pop can’t live off his art, what chance do the rest have?

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I have a soft spot for Iggy Pop, partly because I interviewed him once and he was the soul of charm and erudition, like a particularly smart music professor who just happened to be wearing leather pants and eyeliner. On stage, he’s awe-inspiring, dancing like an electrified Twizzler. (I mean that as the highest possible compliment.) He still makes lean, ferocious music.

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At least he used to. As the head Stooge and godfather of punk revealed this week, he can’t actually live off music any more. Not that Iggy ever had the commercial clout of say, Justin Bieber – which is proof, if you needed, of a god-shaped hole in the universe – but he struggled along from label to label, alienating executives here, picking up new fans over there.

But a new reality has tripped him up and it’s the same one shafting artists all across the world: Namely, that everyone wants to listen, and no one wants to pay. This week, Iggy gave a lecture for the British Broadcasting Corp. called Free Music in a Capitalist Society. Artists have always been ripped off by corporations, he said; now the public is in on the free ride, too: “The cat is out of the bag and the new electronic devices, which estrange people from their morals, also make it easier to steal music than to pay for it.”

To keep skinny body and maverick soul together, Iggy’s become a DJ, a car-insurance pitchman and a fashion model. If he had to live off royalties, he said, he’d have to “tend bars between sets.” As I listened to his enthusiastic stoner Midwestern drawl, I thought: If Iggy Pop can’t make it, what message does that send to all the baby Iggys out there? In a society where worth is judged by price, for better or worse, what are you saying to someone when you won’t pay for the thing he’s crafted?

A few days before Iggy’s lecture, Australian novelist Richard Flanagan won the Booker Prize, the most prestigious in the literary world, for his Second World War story The Narrow Road to the Deep North. Just in time, it sounds like: Mr. Flanagan told reporters that he was making so little from his writing that he was thinking about packing it in and becoming a miner. (He comes from a small mining town in Tasmania.) The prize money of about $90,000 and the following sales bump will allow him to continue, but most of his colleagues aren’t so lucky: “Writing is a very hard life for so many writers,” he said.

This is borne out not only in the quiet sobbing you hear in corners at poetry readings, but in the numbers. This summer, the Guardian newspaper reported that professional writers’ salaries in Britain are collapsing, falling almost 30 per cent over eight years to $20,000.

Here, the Writers’ Union of Canada estimates that authors make an average of $12,000 a year from their words. That will buy approximately two wheels of a car or a door knob on a house in Toronto or Calgary (a broken knob, if the house is in Vancouver).

I hear your cry-me-a-river sighs. You’re thinking, “Nobody asked writers to write. Don’t they know a nice degree in commerce will serve them better in the long run? Nobody asked Iggy to roll around on stage in broken glass. He could have had a nice job as an actuary, although he would have had to keep his pants on.”

But in truth, we do ask: Every time we go to a library or shop, we want it to be full of new books, and when we search various channels (legal and illegal) for new music and movies, we expect to find them. Someone has to produce this content – this art – and sadly, the shoemakers’ elves are all busy stitching elsewhere. And after it’s been produced, someone has to buy it. Or not buy it, as is more likely the case.

It comes down to a question of value: Do we value artists’ effort? The boring years spent in the studio or rehearsal hall, the torched drafts – Mr. Flanagan burned five early versions of his novel before he got it right – the slow, fungal growth of something that lives in the dark and may never be ready for the light? Sorry, that’s the novelist in me talking. Never mind.

I’m glad Iggy Pop and Mr. Flanagan have brought the issue of artists’ earnings out into the open, because it’s too often avoided as embarrassing or demeaning or irrelevant to the process. In fact, it’s crucial. As author and cartoonist Tim Kreider wrote in a recent essay about not getting paid for his work, “money is also how our culture defines value, and being told that what you do is of no ($0.00) value to the society you live in is, frankly, demoralizing.”

Or, to give Iggy the last word, which I think he’d like: “When it comes to art, money is an unimportant detail. It just happens to be a huge unimportant detail.”

Follow Elizabeth Renzetti on Twitter: @lizrenzetti

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wreichard
3 days ago
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"Mr. Flanagan told reporters that he was making so little from his writing that he was thinking about packing it in and becoming a miner."
Earth
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luizirber
2 days ago
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I would buy car insurance from Iggy Pop.
East Lansing, MI
superiphi
3 days ago
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Actually we don't need the shops to be "full of new books", or new music, every time.
Totally happy picking up something with 10 or 50 years of age too. Partly writers & musicians make less because there are so many more of them and too many are interchangeable

People are more likely to pirate what's interchangeable
Idle, Bradford, United Kingdom
JayM
3 days ago
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Boston Metro Area
Cafeine
3 days ago
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Yep... :\
Paris / France

OS X 10.10 Yosemite: The Ars Technica Review

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Yosemite banner
Aurich Lawson / Thinkstock

When the book is finally closed on the product line known as OS X, last year’s release of OS X 10.9 Mavericks may end up getting short shrift. Sure, it brought tangible energy saving benefits to Mac laptop owners, but such gains are quickly taken for granted; internal changes and new frameworks are not as memorable to customers as they may be to developers and technophiles. And while Mavericks included many new user-visible features, and even new bundled applications, the cumulative effect was that of a pleasant upgrade, not a blockbuster.

But for all its timidity and awkwardness, Mavericks marked a turning point for OS X—and in more than just naming scheme. It was the first OS X release from the newly unified, post-Forstall Apple. If iOS 7 was the explosive release of Jony Ive’s pent-up software design ethos, then Mavericks was the embodiment of Craig Federighi’s patient engineering discipline. Or maybe Mavericks was just a victim of time constraints and priorities. Either way, in last year’s OS X release, Apple tore down the old. This year, finally, Apple is ready with the new.

To signal the Mac’s newfound confidence, Apple has traded 10.9’s obscure surfing location for one of the best known and most beautiful national parks: Yosemite. The new OS’s headline feature is one that’s sure to make for a noteworthy chapter in the annals of OS X: an all-new user interface appearance. Of course, this change comes a year after iOS got its extreme makeover.

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fxer
6 days ago
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Best reading all year, every year
Bend, Oregon
fancycwabs
6 days ago
I got to page 4: "Even more excruciating detail about fonts and buttons" before giving up.
fxer
5 days ago
Haha I live Siracusa, his domain is Hypercritical.co if that tells you anything :) Also another post by him on the creation of his Ars review! Spoiler: it requires 2500+ lines of perl. http://hypercritical.co/2014/10/16/yosemite
ChrisDL
6 days ago
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oh man, john siracusa yosemite review. I almost read this more just to appreciate the depth of the actual review and the work that went into it than to find out stuff about yosemite.
New York
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laza
3 days ago
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Siracusa do it again!
Belgrade, Serbia
jimwise
3 days ago
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No MacOS release cycle is complete until the Siracusa review is up...
lukeburrage
6 days ago
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"Read 405 remaining paragraphs" - Thank goodness for Instapaper and a 10 hour flight on Saturday!
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